August 8, 2022

The world reeled from the shock of the news of the assassination, and after a few hours, the passing of former Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. He was 67. It was indeed a shock as gun violence is rare in Japan and the manner the crime was done was an aberration in a society that reveres its elders. People from all over the world expressed their sadness and disbelief on social media, calling Abe a “great leader” and the one “who led Japan through a difficult time.”

President Ferdinand Marcos Jr. relayed the “shock and deep sadness” of the Filipino people when, in a statement, he said, “On behalf of the Philippine Government and the Filipino people, among whom he counts many friends and admirers, I offer my most profound sympathies to his family and the entire Japanese nation.”

The President called Abe a “visionary leader,” a “devoted friend and supporter of the Philippines.” “It was during his (Abe) leadership that the Philippine-Japan relations truly flourished. The decisive and effective assistance he extended to the Philippines and the warmth he demonstrated in the numerous visits he made to our country will never be forgotten, and will be written as one of the most exceptional periods in our bilateral history.”

This sentiment was also reiterated by Vice President Sara Duterte, whose father is known to have close ties with Abe. The former president even invited Abe to his residence in Davao City. Vice President Duterte called Abe’s passing as a “shocking tragedy that exposes the dark side of humanity” and that the world has “lost a great leader.”

“He was a strong ally and a friend of the Philippines, and the immensity of his love and kindness for the Filipinos has been demonstrated many times over through Japan’s support for our growth and development,” said the vice president.

World leaders, friends and even foes, took turns in honoring the life and legacy of Abe, who was Japan’s longest-serving premier.

Born in Tokyo on Sept. 21, 1954, Abe belonged to a prominent political clan. His grandfather, Nobusuke Kishi, was also a prime minister, while his father Shintaro Abe was a foreign minister. The younger Abe served longer in government, eventually occupying the highest post as prime minister from 2006 to 2007, and again from 2012 to 2020.

He was prominent for his “Abe-nomics,” which was launched in 2013 to jumpstart the Japanese economy. Business analysts have said that the impact of Abe-nomics, whether it would be good or bad in the long run, would be felt for generations to come. That is how a visionary leader leaves a legacy.

Whether one is a fan or a critic of Abe, his contributions on the world stage couldn’t be downplayed nor set aside. His decisions for Japan—the world’s third largest economy—reverberated to all shores, even impacting our local trade and economy. The hand that he extended to our country has translated to Japan-funded infrastructure projects, support for our technology sector, and aid during natural calamities. We now reciprocate that kindness and reach out to our Japanese friends to console them in this time of great grief.

The world reeled from the shock of the news of the assassination, and after a few hours, the passing of former Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. He was 67. It was indeed a shock as gun violence is rare in Japan and the manner the crime was done was an aberration in a society that reveres its elders. People from all over the world expressed their sadness and disbelief on social media, calling Abe a “great leader” and the one “who led Japan through a difficult time.”

President Ferdinand Marcos Jr. relayed the “shock and deep sadness” of the Filipino people when, in a statement, he said, “On behalf of the Philippine Government and the Filipino people, among whom he counts many friends and admirers, I offer my most profound sympathies to his family and the entire Japanese nation.”

The President called Abe a “visionary leader,” a “devoted friend and supporter of the Philippines.” “It was during his (Abe) leadership that the Philippine-Japan relations truly flourished. The decisive and effective assistance he extended to the Philippines and the warmth he demonstrated in the numerous visits he made to our country will never be forgotten, and will be written as one of the most exceptional periods in our bilateral history.”

This sentiment was also reiterated by Vice President Sara Duterte, whose father is known to have close ties with Abe. The former president even invited Abe to his residence in Davao City. Vice President Duterte called Abe’s passing as a “shocking tragedy that exposes the dark side of humanity” and that the world has “lost a great leader.”

“He was a strong ally and a friend of the Philippines, and the immensity of his love and kindness for the Filipinos has been demonstrated many times over through Japan’s support for our growth and development,” said the vice president.

World leaders, friends and even foes, took turns in honoring the life and legacy of Abe, who was Japan’s longest-serving premier.

Born in Tokyo on Sept. 21, 1954, Abe belonged to a prominent political clan. His grandfather, Nobusuke Kishi, was also a prime minister, while his father Shintaro Abe was a foreign minister. The younger Abe served longer in government, eventually occupying the highest post as prime minister from 2006 to 2007, and again from 2012 to 2020.

He was prominent for his “Abe-nomics,” which was launched in 2013 to jumpstart the Japanese economy. Business analysts have said that the impact of Abe-nomics, whether it would be good or bad in the long run, would be felt for generations to come. That is how a visionary leader leaves a legacy.

Whether one is a fan or a critic of Abe, his contributions on the world stage couldn’t be downplayed nor set aside. His decisions for Japan—the world’s third largest economy—reverberated to all shores, even impacting our local trade and economy. The hand that he extended to our country has translated to Japan-funded infrastructure projects, support for our technology sector, and aid during natural calamities. We now reciprocate that kindness and reach out to our Japanese friends to console them in this time of great grief.

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